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NEWS
Coral reefs at risk of extinction unless global warming effects are curtailed, warns Unesco
POSTED 04 Jul 2017 . BY Tom Anstey
Unesco’s World Heritage Centre has said that its listed reefs are likely to disappear by the end of the century unless global CO2 output can be reduced drastically.

Over the last three years, 21 of 29 World Heritage-listed reefs have suffered from severe heat stress, with warming waters devastating the natural wonders, causing usually colorful corals to become white and translucent – a process known as coral bleaching.

According a new report by Unesco, the social, cultural and economic value of the world’s coral reefs has been estimated at US$1tn (€881bn, £774bn) annually. The report also says that climate-related loss of reef ecosystems will total US$500bn (€440.5bn, £387bn) by 2100, with economies reliant on reefs severely affected.

“All properties will experience annual severe bleaching, and thus will cease to host functioning coral reef ecosystems by 2100 unless CO2 emissions are reduced,” said the report.

“Delivering on the Paris Agreement target of holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C offers the only opportunity to prevent coral reef decline globally.”

In more recent times a separate study predicted that the Great Barrier Reef in Australia would lose an estimated AU$1bn (£777m, €733m, £618m) in annual tourist revenue should bleaching continue at its current rates. At the Great Barrier Reef, 93 per cent of its coral was affected by the bleaching process last year, with 22 per cent dying as a result.

“The 29 globally significant coral reefs on Unesco’s World Heritage List are facing existential threats, and their loss would be devastating ecologically and economically,” said Dr Mechtild Rossler, director of the World Heritage Centre. “These rainforests of the sea protect coastal communities from flooding and erosion, sustain fishing and tourism businesses, and host a stunning array of marine life.”

Coral bleaching was first recorded in 1983, but the past three years – the hottest globally on record – have been particularly damaging, with 72 per cent of World Heritage-listed reefs affected.

To download the full report, Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs, click here.
RELATED STORIES
Peru addresses Machu Picchu overcrowding with permit system


The Peruvian government has introduced a permit system for Machu Picchu in an attempt to better control footfall at the Unesco World Heritage site.
New conservation guidelines for Buddha birthplace


New recommendations have been laid out for Lumbini – the birthplace of Lord Buddha – following efforts by Unesco to strengthen conservation and management of the World Heritage site.
Great Barrier Reef bleaching could wash away one million visitors, says report


With warming waters devastating parts of the Great Barrier Reef, the Australia Institute – a Canberra-based think tank – has predicted more than a million less people will visit the natural wonder should coral bleaching continue.
Unesco and UNWTO team up to launch 2017 as International Year of Sustainable Tourism


Unesco has thrown its weight behind 2017 as the year of sustainable tourism, taking centre stage at an event designed to highlight the role of tourism in sustainable development.
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Danish architects COBE and Norwegian beer maker Lervig have unveiled plans for a major waterfront visitor centre and brewery in Stavanger, Norway.
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Stunning designs have been revealed for Copenhagen's new Water Culture Centre, which will feature outdoor and indoor pools, waterfalls, harbour baths and sports facilities.
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The Bayeux Tapestry is set to be loaned to a British museum for the first time in nearly a millennium.
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Location: Manchester, United Kingdom
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This year DJW celebrates 30 years in the industry, with David and Lynn Willrich having started the company from the AV department of the National Motor Museum in Beaulieu. [more...]
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NEWS
Coral reefs at risk of extinction unless global warming effects are curtailed, warns Unesco
POSTED 04 Jul 2017 . BY Tom Anstey
Unesco’s World Heritage Centre has said that its listed reefs are likely to disappear by the end of the century unless global CO2 output can be reduced drastically.

Over the last three years, 21 of 29 World Heritage-listed reefs have suffered from severe heat stress, with warming waters devastating the natural wonders, causing usually colorful corals to become white and translucent – a process known as coral bleaching.

According a new report by Unesco, the social, cultural and economic value of the world’s coral reefs has been estimated at US$1tn (€881bn, £774bn) annually. The report also says that climate-related loss of reef ecosystems will total US$500bn (€440.5bn, £387bn) by 2100, with economies reliant on reefs severely affected.

“All properties will experience annual severe bleaching, and thus will cease to host functioning coral reef ecosystems by 2100 unless CO2 emissions are reduced,” said the report.

“Delivering on the Paris Agreement target of holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C offers the only opportunity to prevent coral reef decline globally.”

In more recent times a separate study predicted that the Great Barrier Reef in Australia would lose an estimated AU$1bn (£777m, €733m, £618m) in annual tourist revenue should bleaching continue at its current rates. At the Great Barrier Reef, 93 per cent of its coral was affected by the bleaching process last year, with 22 per cent dying as a result.

“The 29 globally significant coral reefs on Unesco’s World Heritage List are facing existential threats, and their loss would be devastating ecologically and economically,” said Dr Mechtild Rossler, director of the World Heritage Centre. “These rainforests of the sea protect coastal communities from flooding and erosion, sustain fishing and tourism businesses, and host a stunning array of marine life.”

Coral bleaching was first recorded in 1983, but the past three years – the hottest globally on record – have been particularly damaging, with 72 per cent of World Heritage-listed reefs affected.

To download the full report, Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs, click here.
RELATED STORIES
Peru addresses Machu Picchu overcrowding with permit system


The Peruvian government has introduced a permit system for Machu Picchu in an attempt to better control footfall at the Unesco World Heritage site.
New conservation guidelines for Buddha birthplace


New recommendations have been laid out for Lumbini – the birthplace of Lord Buddha – following efforts by Unesco to strengthen conservation and management of the World Heritage site.
Great Barrier Reef bleaching could wash away one million visitors, says report


With warming waters devastating parts of the Great Barrier Reef, the Australia Institute – a Canberra-based think tank – has predicted more than a million less people will visit the natural wonder should coral bleaching continue.
Unesco and UNWTO team up to launch 2017 as International Year of Sustainable Tourism


Unesco has thrown its weight behind 2017 as the year of sustainable tourism, taking centre stage at an event designed to highlight the role of tourism in sustainable development.
MORE NEWS
Revealed: Opening date for Scotland's first design museum, created by Kengo Kuma
V&A Dundee, Scotland’s first design museum, will open to the public on Saturday 15 September 2018, it has been revealed.
Norwegian brewery partners with COBE to create Stavanger waterfront attraction
Danish architects COBE and Norwegian beer maker Lervig have unveiled plans for a major waterfront visitor centre and brewery in Stavanger, Norway.
Designs revealed for new aquatics centre on an artificial quay in Copenhagen’s harbour
Stunning designs have been revealed for Copenhagen's new Water Culture Centre, which will feature outdoor and indoor pools, waterfalls, harbour baths and sports facilities.
Bayeux Tapestry coming to Britain for first time in 950 years
The Bayeux Tapestry is set to be loaned to a British museum for the first time in nearly a millennium.
More news>
LATEST JOBS
Casino Manager
Landers Recruitment
Salary: £30,000
Location: Manchester, United Kingdom
Director of Operations
WWT
Salary: £78,000 p.a.
Location: Slimbridge, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom
Head of Product Excellence
Legoland
Salary: Competitive
Location: Winter Haven, FL, United States
Customer Insights and Analytics Manager
Merlin Entertainments Group
Salary: Competitive
Location: New York, NY, United States
General Manager
Sea Life
Salary: Competitive
Location: Concord, NC, United States
Duty Manager
Madame Tussauds
Salary: Competitive
Location: Washington, DC, United States



 
 
ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2018

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NEWS
Coral reefs at risk of extinction unless global warming effects are curtailed, warns Unesco
POSTED 04 Jul 2017 . BY Tom Anstey
Unesco’s World Heritage Centre has said that its listed reefs are likely to disappear by the end of the century unless global CO2 output can be reduced drastically.

Over the last three years, 21 of 29 World Heritage-listed reefs have suffered from severe heat stress, with warming waters devastating the natural wonders, causing usually colorful corals to become white and translucent – a process known as coral bleaching.

According a new report by Unesco, the social, cultural and economic value of the world’s coral reefs has been estimated at US$1tn (€881bn, £774bn) annually. The report also says that climate-related loss of reef ecosystems will total US$500bn (€440.5bn, £387bn) by 2100, with economies reliant on reefs severely affected.

“All properties will experience annual severe bleaching, and thus will cease to host functioning coral reef ecosystems by 2100 unless CO2 emissions are reduced,” said the report.

“Delivering on the Paris Agreement target of holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C offers the only opportunity to prevent coral reef decline globally.”

In more recent times a separate study predicted that the Great Barrier Reef in Australia would lose an estimated AU$1bn (£777m, €733m, £618m) in annual tourist revenue should bleaching continue at its current rates. At the Great Barrier Reef, 93 per cent of its coral was affected by the bleaching process last year, with 22 per cent dying as a result.

“The 29 globally significant coral reefs on Unesco’s World Heritage List are facing existential threats, and their loss would be devastating ecologically and economically,” said Dr Mechtild Rossler, director of the World Heritage Centre. “These rainforests of the sea protect coastal communities from flooding and erosion, sustain fishing and tourism businesses, and host a stunning array of marine life.”

Coral bleaching was first recorded in 1983, but the past three years – the hottest globally on record – have been particularly damaging, with 72 per cent of World Heritage-listed reefs affected.

To download the full report, Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs, click here.
RELATED STORIES
Peru addresses Machu Picchu overcrowding with permit system


The Peruvian government has introduced a permit system for Machu Picchu in an attempt to better control footfall at the Unesco World Heritage site.
New conservation guidelines for Buddha birthplace


New recommendations have been laid out for Lumbini – the birthplace of Lord Buddha – following efforts by Unesco to strengthen conservation and management of the World Heritage site.
Great Barrier Reef bleaching could wash away one million visitors, says report


With warming waters devastating parts of the Great Barrier Reef, the Australia Institute – a Canberra-based think tank – has predicted more than a million less people will visit the natural wonder should coral bleaching continue.
Unesco and UNWTO team up to launch 2017 as International Year of Sustainable Tourism


Unesco has thrown its weight behind 2017 as the year of sustainable tourism, taking centre stage at an event designed to highlight the role of tourism in sustainable development.
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2018

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS